Letters

Letters

 

At odds with reality

We are told by conservatives that raising the minimum wage will result in loss of employment, as those industries employing low-wage earners will reduce staff as the cost rises. Further, the increase in income among the large numbers at the bottom will result in general inflation, wiping out any increase.

Reality, however, paints a different picture. Real-life studies consistently show that a rise in the minimum wage does not affect employment or business activity and that a mild level of inflation tends regardless.

An example one should examine particularly are those perverse Australians, who have avoided the worst of the world economic recession and yet have a minimum wage of $16, adjusted automatically to living costs.

Yes, Australia’s cost of living is higher. A Big Mac there will cost you 70 cents more, reducing the minimum wage, proportionately, to about $12 in purchasing power, still much higher than here. On the other hand, the worker there gets four weeks annual vacation, sick leave and full health coverage raising it back up again.

Does living upside down in the Southern Hemisphere make their economy behave differently? Or is it more likely that what conservatives staunchly insist is at odds with reality?

Margaret Morris
Ventura
 

The death of USPS

I like the column “Sharper Focus.” Raymond Freeman writes clearly and boldly on interesting and important topics. As a retired postal worker I was particularly impressed with “RIP, USPS.”  However, I think “$100 billion” in political contributions should have read “$100 million.” Not even presidential elections cost that much. This obvious typo in no way lessens the importance of the article. Very few people seem to realize that it is Republican policy to kill the Post Office and the Democrats aren’t making an issue of it. The postal service is important for many small businesses and Mr. Freeman is absolutely right to draw attention to this “Republican treachery” that will profit the few and hurt the many.

James F. Johnson
Simi Valley
 

America’s No. 1!

The USA is now officially number one! It took the Reagan Revolution 30 years to achieve, but yes, we finally made it. The United States now has the highest level of income inequality among the entire world of economically developed nations, by passing hell holes of economic disparity like Russia and Mexico. When Ronald Reagan was elected, the 1 percent earned 10 percent of all income and controlled 20 percent of the nation’s wealth. Today, they take home 20 percent of all income and control at least 40 percent (some estimates are at 60 percent) of all of the nation’s wealth.

In 1980, when Ronald Reagan was elected, the U.S. was the largest creditor nation in the world, the largest producer of manufactured goods in the world, the largest importer of raw material in the world. Twelve years later, the U.S. was the largest debtor nation in the world, the largest importer of manufactured goods in the world, and the largest exporter of raw materials in the world. Now, the economic consequences of that destruction of America’s wealth has completed the cycle, we are once again the two class society of the third world which we exited in the 1950s. Way to go, conservative, you have taken us back to the robber barons of the 1890s.

Norm Rodewald
Moorpark

 

Clarfication
A photo of Stalag 13 which was used in the Aug. 15 story “A Family Affair: Nardcore community to celebrate 35 years of music and friendship” should be credited to Kathy Rodgers. 

Letters

Letters

 

Your stupid assertions

Raymond Freeman is at it again with his “Republicans bad/Democrats good” schtick. He really could save himself and his unfortunate readers a lot of time if he simply plugged in the quoted words in the preceding sentence.  The VCR’s editors — who imagine themselves serious socioeconomic and political commentators — really should be embarrassed at the garbage they allow onto their rag’s pages. The stated goal in his bio is hilarious, though.  I’m not gonna attempt to have a sane and rational debate with a Leftist ideologue who apparently missed that whole collapse of socialism thing during the late ’80s and early ’90s. Instead I’ll tear apart his assertion that All Things Bad since 1975 (Reagan and the GOP being blamed for things PRIOR to them being elected is something only a lefty hack could concoct) are the fault of Reagan and the GOP.

• 1975-1981/1987-1995/2009-2013: Democratic control of the Senate. [Editor’s note: Majority but not 2/3)
• 1975-1995/2007-2011:  Democratic control of the House  [Editor’s note: Majority but not 2/3)
• 1981-1987/1995-2001/2003-2007:  Republican control of the Senate.
• 1995-2007/2011-2013:  Republican control of the House.
• 2001-2003:  Senate tied, Republicans have Vice President tie-breaker.
• 2007-2009:  Republicans and Democrats tied in Senate with two Democratic-siding “Independents.”
www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0774721.html
• Gerald Ford (R):  President 08/09/1974-01/20/1977
• Jimmy Carter (D):  President 01/20/1977-01/20/1981
• Ronald Reagan (R):  President 01/20/1981-01/20/1989
• Bush I (R):  President 01/20/1989-01/20/1993
• Bill Clinton (D):  President 01/20/1993-01/20/2001
• Bush II (R):  President 01/20/2001-01/20/2009
• Barack Obama (D):  President 01/20/2009-Present

Gerald Ford had a Democratic Congress for his brief term. Jimmuh Carter had a Democratic Congress throughout his term (four years’ total control of government). Reagan had a split Congress for all of his. Bush I had a Democrat Congress throughout his term.  Clinton had a Democratic Congress his first two years (two years’ total control of government) and a Republican Congress the rest of the time.  Bush II had a Republican Congress for all but the last two years of his term (six years’ total control of government).  Obama had a Democrat congress his first two years (two years’ total control of government) and a split Congress since.  So, since 1975 Republicans have had the Presidency for 22 years and Democrats for close to 17 now. Democrats have had total control of government for 8 years since 1975 and Republicans for 6. The remainder of the time it’s been split — which means for the VAST majority of the time since 1975 each party has had the power to check the other’s. Please do tell us, Hack Freeman, how this equals “Everything since 1975 Is The Republican Party’s Fault”?! Hack Freeman:  Reagan could do NOTHING without the support of House Democrats. Democrats have had AT LEAST as much political power as Republicans since 1975. My letter kinda makes your assertions look stupid, doesn’t it?

Name withheld
 

Biased opinions

Referring to the “Sharper Focus” article from the Aug.  1 issue, I do not believe I have seen a more politically biased and spun article in a long time. To blame the current economic situation solely on Republicans is ludicrous and without merit. As our current president is finding out, we have a two-party system and it takes a consensus to get laws passed. It is a truly rare occasion when one party can pass anything without support from members of the other party. Obamacare did not get one Republican vote and was passed against the public sentiment because of what I believe was the arrogant opinion by the current administration that what the people wanted did not matter. They knew what was best and, like dictators, went against the will of the people they were elected to serve.  We are now seeing, and will continue to suffer, the effects from this, and I believe the young and less fortunate will be the ones hurt the most. Oh, they may have some form of health care, but not the full time job needed to feed the family and live the American dream. The young will have to pay much more for health care and also face the strangulation of job creation that this new solely Democratic law has created.

 
I am offended by this article as it only continues to divide people when we should be working together to solve the country’s  problems. We are in this together, folks, and we need to work together, and much harder, to solve our problems, not just whine and blame somebody else.  

Jim Hill
Camarillo

 

Back off, Moomjean!

I think Moomjean is going to give me a heart attack one of these days with his ongoing ignorance.  When I was younger, I could work for minimum wage, rent an apartment at the equivalent of a week’s salary and live comfortably.  Today, it is  impossible for anyone to live on minimum wage, unless like so many, the “kids” have come home after graduating from college and have unable to find a “living wage” anywhere.  Where on earth does he get his information?  He asks if “ ‘W” shouldn’t be the holder of a degree, earning $40K per year and working at a “decent” corporation?”  Really!  And where is the line for that opportunity? It would stretch around this country!!  And he condemns our neighbors and friends as being uneducated, unmotivated, ungrateful ad nauseam, who believe they should have the same “perks” as those who climbed the corporate ladder. And just exactly where is that ladder?  That line would be equally long. I don’t know, but doesn’t Moomjean read the papers, listen to the news, read the statistics and, basically, just look around himself to see what is happening in the real world?  As a volunteer at FOOD Share, I encounter, every single day, the real people of this world, who are not asking for something for nothing, but who are struggling to survive because nothing is available to them.  The world is a large and difficult place to navigate; some of us find it easier than others.  But for those who are having such a difficult time making ends meet, and just surviving, especially those with children, they don’t need people like Moomjean looking down on them, judging them, condemning them, and essentially making life more difficult for them.  Back off, Moomjean!  It’s hard enough out here without you!

 

Jan Richman Schulman
Oxnard

 

Urgent need for U.S. EPA action to complete cleanup at Petrochem

The former Petrochem Refinery, which is highly visible from Highway 33 north of Ventura, has been a deteriorating eyesore for 30 years. Worse, hazardous materials from the refinery have leaked onto the ground and underground, and potentially threaten the adjacent Ventura River. Shuttered since 1984, the site is long overdue for clean-up and removal of rusting facilities.

When the County of Ventura exhausted its legal authority to have the Petrochem owner cleanup the property in 2012, the county called in the U.S. EPA with its greater enforcement authority. The US EPA promptly entered the fray, and soon succeeded in getting the Petrochem owner to enter into a consent order requiring cleanup of the site, prevention of polluted runoff and removal of equipment.

 
Cleanup of hazardous materials and spills has been proceeding steadily since the EPA order. However, the section of the consent order that requires removal of equipment from the site has not yet been enforced by the EPA.  This section of the order required the removal of much of the on-site equipment by February 2013.

The EPA’s efforts to force the cleanup of this environmental hazard are much appreciated.  However, part of that cleanup must be the removal of remaining equipment as specified in the signed consent order. After all these years of nonuse, the environment and the community deserve the prompt removal of the dilapidated and hazardous equipment from the Petrochem site.

 
The property owner owes it to the community to clean up the mess that he has left behind, and the U.S. EPA must continue to require him to comply with the terms of the consent order that both parties signed.

 
With the EPA office located in San Francisco, it’s undoubtedly difficult for EPA to work on this project.  We are now six months past the date when equipment should have been removed, and the community’s patience is running out with Petrochem. It is time for the EPA to take aggressive steps to enforce the terms of its order requiring removal of equipment and the schedule for cleanup.

The County of Ventura Environmental Health Division has been voluntarily conducting monitoring of Petrochem compliance on behalf of the U.S. EPA, and will continue to do so. At this point, the best hope for cleanup of the Petrochem site lies in aggressive enforcement by the U.S. EPA.

 
This site lies adjacent or nearby to homes, businesses, the Ventura River, the Ojai Valley Bicycle Trail, the Ventura River Parkway, and in full view of the entrance to the Ojai Valley.  Now is the time to insist that the EPA make completion of the cleanup of the Petrochem site a high priority. The citizens of western Ventura County deserve nothing less.  

Steve Bennett
County Supervisor, First District
 
 
Correction 
Sharper Focus stated in “RIP, USPS,” 8/15, that UPS and FedEx had made “contributions of $100 billion to the Republican Party.”  This was typographical error.  It was supposed to read “$100 million.”  According to the website opensecrets.org, however, the actual number seems closer to $50 million.

 

Letters

Letters

 

Paranoid letter writers

Three out of four letters to the editor in the July 18 VCReporter wrote anonymously! So how in a citizenry-run governance can governing take place if citizens are too fearful to talk to each other? “… land of the free and home of the brave,” really?  

Duane Waln
Camarillo

 

The worst

Your feature story about life in county jail in last week’s VCReporter (The Ultimate Reality Show by Butch Warner, July 18) that profiled select inmates based on their “celebrity” status (then comparing them to reality television’s “bad boys,” where the inmate celebrities were to be considered the “real deal”) was tasteless and repulsive at best, and terribly irresponsible at worst.

First off, there was not one “success story” of an inmate who has turned his or her life around, nor were any jail officers, administrators or social workers interviewed for comments. All you had were inmates being profiled who had gained “celebrity status” while in custody, where such celebrity status is earned by virtue of being the “baddest boy on the block” (as it were). Or for some other ridiculous reason.

I did not appreciate the free publicity given by your paper to these criminal inmates, or the inference that it’s somehow “cooler” to be a criminal in jail than an actor on television. Or that being the baddest boy in prison is somehow “cool.” All of these messages are WRONG and IRRESPONSIBLE and should NEVER HAVE BEEN ALLOWED IN PRINT!

With our prisons overcrowded and inmates being released before they have served out their full sentences, society is stressed enough with these gangster thugs roaming our streets.

To further glamorize their lives of crime with a full four-page (Editor’s note: it was actually two pages) feature story in the VCReporter was one of the worst examples of journalistic irresponsibility and editorial indiscretion that I have EVER come across in my entire life!

One would think that the least that your paper can do now is to feature any of these clowns after they get out of prison, and ONLY if they have had a few YEARS in which they can PROVE that they have turned their lives around (and I don’t mean becoming a local preacher or teen counselor).

Justin Markman
Ventura

Justin Markman is not employed by and has no formal ties to local, state or federal law enforcement, nor was he asked by law enforcement to write this letter.

 

Share the Road, the Laws, the Cost

Mr. Alan Sailer is certainly justified to have his own opinion on this or any other subject for that matter. (Letters, 725) It’s too bad Mr. Sailer did not read my first letter completely, or if he did he simply didn’t understand it.

First off, I have absolutely no animosity toward cyclists. What I was referring to in my letter about the right-turn problem is that on Thompson and Telephone, the bike lane is moved on the left of the right turn lane so that any car making a right turn has to pass over the bike lane.  To expect the drivers of cars to have to make way for cyclists is ridiculous. Just an accident waiting to happen.

Secondly, Mr. Sailer makes the same argument about paying his fair share as most other cyclists do. “I pay license and insurance on my car and pay gasoline taxes so I am paying my fair share.”  Well, Mr. Sailer, I have a car, my wife has a car and I also have a Honda motor scooter. I have to pay license and insurance on all of my vehicles in order to use the public roads, so does that mean I have paid my fair share three times? Or perhaps I should be allowed to drive my Honda scooter around without license or insurance.

There has been over $24 million dollars spent in California on amenities for cyclists in the past couple of years, the cyclist have contributed nothing directly for this cost. The state has given over almost half of the roadways, bike lanes, green boxes, bicycle racks and others which the drivers of cars help pay for.

As the sign says, “Share the Road.” They need to add a couple of lines to those signs. They should read in whole, “Share the Road, the Laws, the Cost.”

I am glad that Mr. Sailer would be OK with cyclists being made to license and insure their vehicles. I also realize Mr. Sailer was intending to interject a bit of humor with his statement about a 5-year-old girl filling out insurance forms and/or not allowing anybody below the age of 18 to ride a bike. At least I hope it was an attempt at humor.

FYI: In the city of Ventura, cyclists are allowed to ride their bicycles on the sidewalks everywhere except in the Downtown area, although on any day you will still see bicycles being ridden on the Downtown sidewalks. You will also see cyclists riding through stop signs, red lights, and breaking other rules of the road. I inquired with the Ventura Police Department about how many tickets had been given to cyclists for running stop signs or red lights in 2012, the answer from the police department was, one (1) ticket had been given in the entire year.

 

Rellis Smith
Ventura

 

Not so smart

Thank you so much for printing the article on smart meters (News, 7/25). Edison has so much money to fight the truth, it is hard to be heard.

Two members of Congress (Jerry McNerney, D- Stockton; and Matt Cartwright, D- Pa.) have introduced a congressional bill (HR 2685) that would apparently require all electricity providers (including rural cooperatives and municipal utilities) to join the “smart” grid and …

This is our next battle to fight.

John Puccetti
Ventura

 

Opting out

Loved your article on the Smart Meter. Lucky for me I saw it on the news when Marin County was in an uproar about the radiation. When my notice came I did an opt-out. I paid extra not yo have one and I pay extra every month. I also alerted my area.

Thank you for educating people on what is going on. I even learned a few things from your article.

Thanks again!

Kelly Gladstone
Ventura

 

Not the call of duty

After reading this article (“And justice for Zimmerman,” Right Persuasion, 7/25) a few things jumped out at me. First, it seems like Moomjean was not that happy to be done with the year-long coverage of the story since he chose to write about it. Next, let’s move on to the part of poor Zimmerman being sick of the police allowing eight robberies in his neighborhood. Really? I have never seen the law officials allow their citizens to be victims of any crime. Poor Zimmerman had to arm himself, to follow the trespasser. Since when does walking down a public street constitute Trayvon now being a trespasser committing a crime? No crime was ever committed by Trayvon. The only thing Mr. Moomjean was correct on was that race should not matter.

Now I will get to how my family was a victim of a few attempted robberies, one occurring while my teenage children were at home alone while I went to the grocery store at 5 in the afternoon. When I got home minutes later and called police, not only were they there in minutes, they had numerous officers’ vehicles and did a great investigation. Unfortunately, they could not find the perpetrator.

They next informed me I can buy a shotgun to protect my family. I won’t miss with a shotgun. I just got to make sure they are in my house before I can shoot. I thanked them for the advice but told them I will call them again since it is their job. The problem with the Zimmerman story is he was never threatened until he went after Trayvon. There is a big difference between self- protection and him really believing he was law enforcement to protect his neighborhood. It was not his job. They did not want him to be an officer with them. That is the difference when you are just a civilian — you make the call for the professional like all other jobs. Interesting how Mr. Zimmerman did not start grabbing garden hoses in the neighborhood to help the firefighters with their jobs, but people believe just because you own a firearm the police now need help with their job. Common sense tells you we all can’t have members of the community running around playing judge and jury. It should not matter what color Trayvon was. It is ignorant to say otherwise. What should matter is that he was a human being walking down the street. Another human being killed him. He will never make it home again to his family. The court has spoken; Mr. Moomjean is right about that but that does not mean it was a great thing Zimmerman did. It means the law has to be revised again to reflect the true intent of which it was written.

Now I am just wondering where Mr. Moomjean’s jaded thoughts about law enforcement not wanting to do their jobs come from. Did the local law enforcement unions not support him for his run for Simi Valley mayor? Kind of funny he threw them under the bus trying to support Zimmerman.

Jacquie Colmenero
Ventura

Letters

Letters

 

Addressing a discrepancy

Paul Moomjean laments the distances that private schools like Oaks Christian and St. Bonaventure must travel in order to play other like-minded private schools in their athletic endeavors (Right Persuasion, 7/11). However, part of this may be their own fault.

The last I knew, public schools were unable to recruit student athletes outside their attendance boundaries. Private schools are. Consequently, the private schools which were interested in developing the best athletic programs could recruit student athletes anywhere they chose to.

Consequently, as the power of private-school teams grew and grew among the sports-prone privates, they had to form leagues from a number of far-off areas, which resulted in the long trips Mr. Moomjean described. If the private schools had the same attendance restrictions as their public school counterparts, this discrepancy might cease to exist.

Bruce Mitchell
Oxnard

 

Reality check

As a young man, I was taught to respect people like fire fighters, police, teachers and nurses and other such people who served the public. Now I find that such people are held in utter contempt by people like Mr. Name Withheld (Letters, 7/18). Just a few things to consider about teachers. To be a teacher you need to go to school for a minimum of five years. Then you work, essentially for free, as a student teacher. Then, if you are so lucky to get hired in this lousy economy, you get to work long hours to do your job. Contrary to popular belief, teachers routinely work before and after school on their own time. We don’t get paid not to work in the summer; we have our checks prorated so we have an income in the summer, those of use who aren’t working in the summer. Many of us, myself included, work other side jobs to make ends meet. The starting pay is usually on the low end for a person of such education compared to many other professions or similar education levels.

Few teachers are in it for the money. By the way, most districts require that a teacher put up half their contribution to their retirement. It has been common practice to provide some retirement benefits as a compensation for the relatively low pay that teachers traditionally have gotten.

Personally, I worked 10-12-hour days to do the job I felt was necessary as a science teacher. There were no little elves or fairies to set up or to take down my labs. I worked six days a week and spent on average $1,000-$2,000 of my after-tax income on supplies for my classes. On Sundays, when I went to school to prepare for the forthcoming week, I would see several of my colleagues doing the same thing. This is not unusual. I love my work and my students. It is the hardest and most demanding job I have ever had.

But don’t take my word for it, Mr. Name Withheld, if you have a college degree (You can thank all those evil teachers for teaching you to read and write, etc.), take the CBEST test, get an emergency credential and see if you can get a long-term substitute position for, say, four to six weeks. You do the lesson plans, you grade the papers, you try to keep the students engaged and involved in their own education, and last but not least, you do the discipline. This is not a Leave It to Beaver world in which students come in and eagerly wait for you to educate them. It’s a little more challenging than that.

I challenge you to do this. Then when you have walked a mile in my shoes, we can talk.

Oh, and by the way, I didn’t see you complaining about many of the CEOs in business making between 300 and 500 times the average worker in their company.

Name NOT Withheld
Tim Peddicord
Oak View

 

Paranoid letter writers

Three out of four letters to the editor in the July 18 VCReporter wrote anonymously! So how in a citizenry-run governance can governing take place if citizens are too fearful to talk to each other? “… land of the free and home of the brave,” really?  

Duane Waln
Camarillo

 

The worst

Your feature story about life in county jail in last week’s VCReporter (The Ultimate Reality Show by Butch Warner, July 18) that profiled select inmates based on their “celebrity” status (then comparing them to reality television’s “bad boys,” where the inmate celebrities were to be considered the “real deal”) was tasteless and repulsive at best, and terribly irresponsible at worst.

First off, there was not one “success story” of an inmate who has turned his or her life around, nor were any jail officers, administrators or social workers interviewed for comments. All you had were inmates being profiled who had gained “celebrity status” while in custody, where such celebrity status is earned by virtue of being the “baddest boy on the block” (as it were). Or for some other ridiculous reason.

I did not appreciate the free publicity given by your paper to these criminal inmates, or the inference that it’s somehow “cooler” to be a criminal in jail than an actor on television. Or that being the baddest boy in prison is somehow “cool.” All of these messages are WRONG and IRRESPONSIBLE and should NEVER HAVE BEEN ALLOWED IN PRINT!

With our prisons overcrowded and inmates being released before they have served out their full sentences, society is stressed enough with these gangster thugs roaming our streets.

To further glamorize their lives of crime with a full four-page (Editor’s note: it was actually two pages) feature story in the VCReporter was one of the worst examples of journalistic irresponsibility and editorial indiscretion that I have EVER come across in my entire life!

One would think that the least that your paper can do now is to feature any of these clowns after they get out of prison, and ONLY if they have had a few YEARS in which they can PROVE that they have turned their lives around (and I don’t mean becoming a local preacher or teen counselor).

Justin Markman
Ventura

Justin Markman is not employed by and has no formal ties to local, state or federal law enforcement, nor was he asked by law enforcement to write this letter.

Share the Road, the Laws, the Cost

Mr. Alan Sailer is certainly justified to have his own opinion on this or any other subject for that matter. (Letters, 725) It’s too bad Mr. Sailer did not read my first letter completely, or if he did he simply didn’t understand it.
First off, I have absolutely no animosity toward cyclists. What I was referring to in my letter about the right-turn problem is that on Thompson and Telephone, the bike lane is moved on the left of the right turn lane so that any car making a right turn has to pass over the bike lane.  To expect the drivers of cars to have to make way for cyclists is ridiculous. Just an accident waiting to happen.

Secondly, Mr. Sailer makes the same argument about paying his fair share as most other cyclists do. “I pay license and insurance on my car and pay gasoline taxes so I am paying my fair share.”  Well, Mr. Sailer, I have a car, my wife has a car and I also have a Honda motor scooter. I have to pay license and insurance on all of my vehicles in order to use the public roads, so does that mean I have paid my fair share three times? Or perhaps I should be allowed to drive my Honda scooter around without license or insurance.

There has been over $24 million dollars spent in California on amenities for cyclists in the past couple of years, the cyclist have contributed nothing directly for this cost. The state has given over almost half of the roadways, bike lanes, green boxes, bicycle racks and others which the drivers of cars help pay for.

As the sign says, “Share the Road.” They need to add a couple of lines to those signs. They should read in whole, “Share the Road, the Laws, the Cost.”

I am glad that Mr. Sailer would be OK with cyclists being made to license and insure their vehicles. I also realize Mr. Sailer was intending to interject a bit of humor with his statement about a 5-year-old girl filling out insurance forms and/or not allowing anybody below the age of 18 to ride a bike. At least I hope it was an attempt at humor.

FYI: In the city of Ventura, cyclists are allowed to ride their bicycles on the sidewalks everywhere except in the Downtown area, although on any day you will still see bicycles being ridden on the Downtown sidewalks. You will also see cyclists riding through stop signs, red lights, and breaking other rules of the road. I inquired with the Ventura Police Department about how many tickets had been given to cyclists for running stop signs or red lights in 2012, the answer from the police department was, one (1) ticket had been given in the entire year.

Rellis Smith
Ventura

 

Not so smart

Thank you so much for printing the article on smart meters (News, 7/25). Edison has so much money to fight the truth, it is hard to be heard.

Two members of Congress (Jerry McNerney, D- Stockton; and Matt Cartwright, D- Pa.) have introduced a congressional bill (HR 2685) that would apparently require all electricity providers (including rural cooperatives and municipal utilities) to join the “smart” grid and …

This is our next battle to fight.

John Puccetti
Ventura

 

Letters

Letters

 

Fascist means togetherness

Although I doubt you will publish it, after reading such collection of propagandistic fact-distortions and hateful lies, stated in Mr. Freeman’s opinion “Downton Abbey,” I could not resist to react on. It would be too long to contradict every misquote so I’ll be brief.

It seems, he, Mr. Freeman that is, is either naïve, freshly brainwashed by our pro-socialist school system graduate or one of those core-belief Marxists produced in the ‘60s. For him not making it, he hates wealthy people and blames Republicans for everything. Not wealthy people but well-paid employees are job creators is the most ridiculous thing I ever heard anyone to say, but credit should go where is belongs. Obama said it first. Nevertheless, let’s go to the point.
Here are some inconvenient facts.

Contrary to Mr. Freeman’s hateful statement, Reagan’s tax cuts produced a seven-year period of uninterrupted growth (and another 12 years of prosperity after that), biggest peacetime economic boom in U.S. history, as Wall Street Journal editor R. Barley stated. Measured in 1990 dollars, median income, which declined during the 1970s (Carter’s years), climbed from $33,409 in 1980 to 38,493 in 1989, a 15 percent increase. Million new businesses created 20 million new jobs, interest fell from 21 percent to 10 percent, poverty dropped from 15.2 percent to 12.8 percent. Freeman is right that middle class became measurably smaller, but he omitted mentioning that the reason was upward movement into affluent status. The percentage of families earning more than $50,000 rose five points. The average income of the top 20 percent of population increased from $70,056 to $85,529 in 1989, more than 30,000 people entered into ranks of millionaires, and the biggest group moving upward were blacks. Everyone benefited from his policies, but this was unacceptable to people like Mr. Freeman (and still is), so mass media worked very hard on distorting such facts.

Contrary to this turnaround, Mr. Obama is fifth year in the office and there are still 24 million unemployed, and countless underemployed, regardless applying his socialistic ideas and exempting his favorite big businesses as GM is and labor unions of burden of his regulations. Running business becomes so expensive, many small businesses are not making it, many moving out of California or USA. Why? Because his core Marxist belief is the government is the solution. It is not; government is the problem, and BIG government is like a cancer. Cities and states run by liberal Democrats are bankrupt, falling apart. (Detroit is the last one.)

It is really laughable, him saying that Republicans spent millions on “lies factories,” omitting to notice, not counting others, only billionaire Soros created over six thousand leftist organizations and spent over 4 billion on influencing our elections. (I wonder if your paper is on his payroll, too? Is it?)

Business has generally two purposes: bringing new products to the market and reward those who started it. Mr. Freeman seemingly never run a business; otherwise he would know it takes many years and long hours before one could reap six-digit income, and then is demonized for it. (M. Romney is a typical example.) When the state is creating conditions for business that are impossible to live with (taxes, regulations), since business is not a social setting, it moves elsewhere. So if corporations are moving out, it is only our government and leftist (now calling themselves progressive) politicians to blame. Capitalism brought up from poverty more people than any other system, and wouldn’t be the endless intrusions of people with mindset as Mr. Freeman, we would be long time ago from this misery. Who has it backward are progressives, mainly Democrats. Their model failed every time it was tried, bringing and destruction on millions of people. (I have live through this for 40 years.) Soviet Union, Nazis, Fascistic Italia, every country who tried it failed. Yes, Nazis = National Socialism, and yes gascists, same thing in a different color. By the way, if you did not know, fascist is derived from Latin word fasce, meaning togetherness or bonded and symbol of Italian Fascists was a red circle with three black lines in it, representing unity between leading political party and labor unions and big business. Sound familiar?  

Tomas Jina
Santa Paul

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UPCOMING COMMUNITY EVENTS

  1. Multiple Ones: Contemporary Perspectives in Printmedia

    August 22 @ 8:00 am - October 23 @ 8:00 pm
  2. Loni Love Headlines Levity Live

    September 20 @ 7:30 pm - September 22 @ 9:00 pm
  3. 2019 Quilt Rooms and Gardens Tour

    September 21 @ 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
  4. 3rd Annual Southeast Ventura County YMCA Reach For The Stars Gala

    September 21 @ 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm
  5. Premiere Party for “Beyond Function: Fiber, Wood and Clay”

    September 21 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
  6. Fundraiser for Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute (CIMWI)

    September 21 @ 5:30 pm - 9:30 pm
  7. Oxnard National Drive Electric Vehicle (EV) Showcase

    September 22 @ 9:30 am - 3:00 pm
  8. Chamber On The Mountain presents Tomer Gewirtzman, Pianist

    September 22 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  9. Morning Stretch to Classic Rock

    September 23 @ 8:00 am - 8:45 am
  10. Dancer’s Body Barre

    September 23 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

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